Yoga

Read “Yoga Explained” further down the page, as extracted from the Victorian Government Better Health Website.

Back Straight Massage is currently running classes at the Wodonga Senior Secondary College – Sports Centre, Woodland St (Directions below), 4pm and 5.30pm Wednesdays and 8am Saturdays. For more information, please call 02 60413362 anytime.

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Led by Amita, who is an Australian accredited Exercise Scientist and Remedial Massage therapist at Back Straight Massage.

BackStraight Massage Low Res ManifeastoPhotography 2016 (12 of 21)

Amita studied yoga at Punjabi University in Northern India and focuses more on the Hatha and Ashtanga styles of yoga which result in a more therapeutic form, including stretching, flexibility and strength exercise. A more everyday type of yoga for stress and anxiety can be included as needed.x

Beginners and experienced participants are all welcome. Classes will be arranged in groups depending on the various needs and abilities of the participants.

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Yoga explained (as extracted from the Vic government Better Health website)

Yoga is an ancient Indian philosophy that dates back thousands of years. It was designed as a path to spiritual enlightenment, but in modern times, the physical aspects of Hatha yoga have found huge popularity as a gentle form of exercise and stress management. There are many different varieties of yoga, but each one essentially relies on structured poses (asanas) practiced with breath awareness.

Researchers have discovered that the regular practice of yoga may produce many health benefits, including increased fitness and normalisation of blood pressure. Yoga is a renowned antidote to stress. Over time, yoga practitioners report lower levels of stress, and increased feelings of happiness and wellbeing. This is because concentrating on the postures and the breath acts as a form of meditation.

The classical techniques of yoga date back more than 5,000 years. The practice of yoga encourages effort, intelligence, accuracy, thoroughness, commitment and dedication. The word yoga means ‘to join or yoke together’. It brings your body and mind together, and is built on three main elements – exercise, breathing and meditation.

The exercises of yoga are designed to put pressure on the glandular systems of your body, increasing your body’s efficiency and total health. Breathing techniques increase breath control to improve the health and function of body and mind.

The two systems of exercise and breathing prepare the body and mind for meditation, with an approach to a quiet mind that allows silence and healing from everyday stress. When practiced regularly, yoga can become a powerful and sophisticated discipline for achieving physical, mental and emotional wellbeing.

Types of yoga

There are many different varieties of yoga, each with a slightly different slant. The most popular are Hatha, Bikram, Iyengar and Vinyasa yoga.

Asanas or yoga postures

Each yoga posture, or asana, is held for a period of time and linked with breathing. Generally, a yoga session begins with gentle asanas and works up to more vigorous or challenging postures. A full yoga session should exercise every part of your body and should include pranayama (breath control practices), relaxation and meditation.

The different postures or asanas include:

  • lying postures
  • sitting postures
  • standing postures
  • inverted or upside-down postures.

Health benefits of yoga

The practice of yoga asanas develops strength and flexibility, while soothing your nerves and calming your mind. The asanas affect the muscles, joints and skin, and the whole body – glands, nerves, internal organs, bones, respiration and the brain. The physical building blocks of yoga are the posture and the breath.

Health benefits of yoga include:

  • Cardiovascular system (heart and arteries) – asanas are isometric, which means they rely on holding muscle tension for a short period of time. This improves cardiovascular fitness and circulation. Studies show that regular yoga practice may help normalise blood pressure.
  • Digestive system – improved blood circulation and the massaging effect of surrounding muscles speeds up a sluggish digestion.
  • Musculoskeletal – joints are moved through their full range of motion, which encourages mobility and eases pressure. The gentle stretching releases muscle and joint tension, and stiffness, and also increases flexibility. Maintaining many of the asanas encourages strength and endurance. Weight-bearing asanas may help prevent osteoporosis, and may also help people already diagnosed with osteoporosis (if practiced with care under the supervision of a qualified yoga teacher). Long-term benefits include reduced back pain and improved posture.
  • Nervous system – improved blood circulation, easing of muscle tension and the act of focusing the mind on the breath all combine to soothe the nervous system. Long-term benefits include reduced stress, anxiety and fatigue, better concentration and energy levels, and increased feelings of calm and wellbeing.

Yoga for people of different ages

Yoga is taught in classes, catering for beginners through to advanced practitioners. It is non-competitive and suitable for anyone, regardless of your age or fitness level. Your yoga teacher should carefully guide and observe you, and modify postures when necessary.

An asana should never cause pain. If it hurts, ease back on the stretch or don’t do it at all. It is important to keep within your physical limits.

If you are over 40, haven’t exercised for a long time or have a pre-existing medical condition, you should check with your doctor before starting any regular exercise routine.

Pre-exercise screening is used to identify people with medical conditions that may put them at a higher risk of experiencing a health problem during physical activity. It is a filter or ‘safety net’ to help decide if the potential benefits of exercise outweigh the risks for you.

Yoga classes usually have 10 to 20 people, allowing for individual attention. Suggestions for getting the most out of your yoga class include:

  • Wear comfortable clothes and take a blanket or mat, since many poses are performed sitting or lying down.
  • Allow at least three or four hours since your last meal.
  • Always tell your yoga teacher if you have a specific complaint, so they can advise against any asanas that may aggravate your problem.
  • Always tell your yoga teacher if you are pregnant, have had a recent injury, illness, surgery, high blood pressure, heart problems or osteoporosis.
  • Don’t talk during the class because it will disturb your own quiet focus and that of others in the class.

Albury Branch

710 Young Street
Albury NSW, 2640

Ph. 02 60413362
 

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